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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that all product photographs, descriptions and specifications on this website are accurate. However, inadvertent errors may occur, and changes in design or materials, due to our continual effort to improve products, may result in some change in specifications before subsequent publications are issued.
Any Soldier® reserves the right to modify or change specifications without notice.

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Please donate HERE AFTER you request an address.
LT John W. Beal
- U. S. Coast Guard -
Bahrain
LT John W. Beal
(Click HERE to request the complete address.) (NOTE *)
Make a donation, please. Click HERE AFTER you get an address.
(This address has been requested 69 times.) (NOTE **)
Coast Guardsman's Title: Commanding Officer
APO/FPO: FPO AE (Note 1*)
Added here: 19 July 2017
Expect to not mail past: 01 May 2018 (See Note 3*)
Contact for approx number of Males: 22, Females: 0 (Note 5*)
Unit is from: Other (Note 6*)
Restrictions to this address: Here (Note 7*)
(Note: Addresses that have changed will be noted "Address Has Changed".)

25 Oct 2017:
Dear Any Soldier/Any Coastie donors and participants,

Good afternoon from the Arabian Gulf, and thank you so much for your care package support through the Any Soldier/Any Coastie Program! My name is John Beal and I am the Commanding Officer of US Coast Guard Cutter AQUIDNECK, one of six forward-deployed Coast Guard cutters stationed in Manama, Kingdom of Bahrain. Your donations and well-wishes help to keep us "Semper Paratus" which is our CG motto in Latin meaning "Always Ready." If you include an email address in your notes or cards within the care package, I can respond pretty quickly and include photos of the crew/ship.

We are extremely appreciative of your support from back home. Our current crew is all male and comprised of 3 officers and 19 enlisted members serving 12-15 month deployments, and in our company are our sister ships ADAK, BARANOF, MAUI, MONOMOY, and WRANGELL. About 50% of my crew changes out this Winter so we'll have a bunch of new guys arriving from the States to begin their tour around the holidays. Those guys leaving have completed a tough and successful tour of duty, and the reward is to return to their families and new assignments in the States where they will continue to serve in Coast Guard missions including drug interdiction, search & rescue, aids to navigation, marine safety, law enforcement, marine environmental protection, migrant interdiction, living marine resources, port & waterways security, ice operations, and defense readiness.

The Coast Guard's 110 foot patrol boats are our "Island Class" cutters, each uniquely named for islands around the United States. Aquidneck Island rests in Narragansett Bay in Rhode Island and is home to several Navy and Coast Guard units. There were a total of 49 110' cutters of our class built starting in the mid-1980s, but a majority of them have since been decommissioned and retired from service because of their age. The 110's are being replaced by our new 154 foot Fast Response Cutters which are far more advanced and capable ships. AQUIDNECK was commissioned in September 1986, so she's survived well beyond her expected service life and under our crew she continues to perform admirably. Before being shipped to the Middle East she was homeported in Atlantic Beach, NC where she conducted law enforcement, fisheries management, and search and rescue missions. After 9/11, she was tasked with a new mission of homeland security and national defense, which included patrolling the Eastern seaboard to protect commerce and vital port facilities from the threat of terrorism. At the request of the Navy, AQUIDNECK arrived in Bahrain in March 2003 as part of the coalition force for the war in Iraq. Since then we've been a vital part of the Navy's 5th Fleet and patrolled the entirety of the Arabian Gulf, and sometimes beyond it, to remain combat ready.

A little bit about myself:

I am originally from Massachusetts - graduated high school and entered the service in 2007 through the US Coast Guard Academy in New London, CT (our service's equivalent of Annapolis for the Navy or West Point for the Army). After an 8-week basic training course I spent 4 years at the Academy and graduated in 2011, earning my commission as an officer (O-1/Ensign). I was first assigned to the 270' cutter MOHAWK (WMEC 913) in Key West FL doing counter-drug and alien migrant interdiction operations in the Caribbean Sea and Central America; my second assignment was to the 110' cutters BLOCK ISLAND (WPB 1344), KODIAK ISLAND (WPB 1341), and CUSHING (WPB 1321) in Atlantic Beach NC doing maritime law enforcement, search and rescue, and fisheries enforcement in the Mid-Atlantic region; my third assignment was as a training officer based out of San Diego and visiting all CG ships on the West Coast including Hawaii, Guam, and Alaska; and present day I have the pleasure of being the AQUIDNECK's Captain.

My rotation date is somewhere around 01 May 2018 at which point I will pass the care package receipt torch to the new CO if you wish to continue your sponsorship. This email address is the best contact for me and I generally have access both inport and at sea. I've included a few specific notes below regarding care packages:

1) When we’re not on the ship out to sea, we are assigned to shoreside accommodations with kitchens and access to the commissary/base exchange and local grocery stores.
2) While inport, most of our guys buy internet devices for WiFi; while at sea we are restricted to work email and there is a shoreside mail clerk who holds all letters and packages for us until we return. We do not really have a need for phone calling cards; those may be better suited for troops elsewhere.
3) Being in an Islamic country, we cannot receive pork products or other items deemed culturally inappropriate here; they even block some news/website access online.
4) The weather between April and October is usually over 100 degrees plus humidity, so it often feels like 130; it starts to cool down between Nov-Mar and folks say it gets "cold" at night in the winter (~70 degrees).
5) We are assigned to a US Navy base where we have more resources available to us when not at sea.
6) We have an independent duty cook onboard and do not have an assigned medic.

I am very grateful for your sponsorship of our crew. There is a fine morality line about requesting certain items to be sent to us, but general male hygiene, cleanliness, food and drink items are always appreciated. I assure you nothing will go to waste between our six cutters, and while we do not have women onboard my ship any packages marked "female" or feminine hygiene products will be delivered to the Coastie women aboard ADAK and MONOMOY or to shoreside personnel. Thank you!

Very Respectfully,

John William Beal, LT




21 Sep 2017

Dear Any Soldier donors and participants,

Good afternoon from the Arabian Gulf! My name is John Beal and I am the Commanding Officer of US Coast Guard Cutter AQUIDNECK, one of six forward-deployed Coast Guard cutters stationed in Manama, Kingdom of Bahrain. After returning to port from a recent patrol, we were welcomed by a mail call with care packages full of goodies and handwritten notes from Any Soldier contributors. The crew immediately dug into them and we restocked our snack shelves with your generous donations. Those rations help to keep us "Semper Paratus" which is our CG motto in Latin meaning "Always Ready." The crew and I are extremely appreciative of your support from back home. I've included below a brief description of our cutter and overseas assignment.

Our current crew is all male and comprised of 3 officers and 19 enlisted members, and in our company are our sister ships ADAK, BARANOF, MAUI, MONOMOY, and WRANGELL. Here is a link to a YouTube video a previous crew recorded showcasing some of our experiences out here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wKgCrwrzx5M (we are looking to create a new one) and there are a few more available from other cutters. Few people are even aware that the USCG has personnel deployed beyond our shoreline, so I hope the YouTube videos help donors gain a greater understanding of what the less than 300 deployed Coasties do out here in support of U.S. CENTCOM initiatives, and to whom their donations, thank you notes, and support are delivered.

The Coast Guard's 110 foot patrol boats are our "Island Class" cutters, each uniquely named for islands around the United States. Aquidneck Island rests in Narragansett Bay in Rhode Island and is home to Naval Station Newport and several Coast Guard units as well. There were a total of 49 110' cutters of our class built starting in the mid-1980s, but a majority of them have since been decommissioned and retired from service because of their age. The 110's are being replaced by our new 154 foot Fast Response Cutters which are far more advanced and capable ships. AQUIDNECK was commissioned in September 1986, so she's survived well beyond her expected service life and under our crew she continues to perform admirably. Before being shipped to the Middle East she was homeported in Atlantic Beach, NC where she conducted law enforcement, fisheries management, and search and rescue missions. After 9/11, she was tasked with a new mission of homeland security and national defense, which included patrolling the Eastern seaboard to protect commerce and vital port facilities from the threat of terrorism. At the request of the Navy, AQUIDNECK arrived in Bahrain in March 2003 as part of the coalition force for the war in Iraq. Since then we've been a vital part of the Navy's 5th Fleet and patrolled the entirety of the Arabian Gulf, and sometimes beyond it, to remain combat ready.

Here is a link detailing the achievements of my ship's first Commanding Officer after the cutter's re-assignment to Bahrain (our service's first female recipient of the Bronze Star): http://coastguard.dodlive.mil/2015/10/the-long-blue-line-first-coast-guard-female-recipient-of-bronze-star-medal/

It is our pleasure to serve and we are so very grateful for the support of citizens like you and communities like yours. The ethics training we receive associated with gifts precludes us from asking for particular items in care packages, but here are a few notes to help guide what you send us:

1) When we’re not on the ship out to sea, we are assigned to shoreside accommodations with kitchens and access to the commissary/base exchange and local grocery stores.
2) While inport, most of our guys buy internet devices for WiFi; while at sea we are restricted to work email and there is a shoreside mail clerk who holds all letters and packages for us until we return. We do not really have a need for phone calling cards; those may be better suited for troops elsewhere.
3) Being in an Islamic country, we cannot receive pork products or other items deemed culturally inappropriate here; they even block some news/website access online.
4) The weather between April and October is usually over 100 degrees plus humidity, so it often feels like 130...it starts to cool down between Nov-Mar and folks say it gets "cold" at night in the winter.

Please pass along our many thanks to anyone who contributed to the stocking, packing, and shipment of these care packages. I assure you nothing will go to waste between our six cutters, and while we do not have women onboard my ship, any packages with feminine hygiene products will be delivered to the Coastie women aboard ADAK and MONOMOY. Thank you!

Very Respectfully,

John William Beal, LT




19 Jul 2017

Good afternoon from the Arabian Gulf! My name is John Beal and I am the Commanding Officer of US Coast Guard Cutter AQUIDNECK, one of forward-deployed Coast Guard cutters stationed in Bahrain. The crew would be extremely appreciative of any support available, basic snacks and toiletries to stay clean and healthy(cannot receive pork products, we have no laundry onboard, we do have a microwave/reefer/freezer, we live off ship when in homeport). Those rations help to keep us "Semper Paratus" which is our CG motto meaning "Always Ready."
I also included below a brief description of our ship and overseas assignment: our current crew is all male (there are females on our other ships) and comprised of members from all over the United States, and each crewmember's deployment lasts 12-15 months. The Coast Guard's 110 foot patrol boats are our "Island Class" ships, each uniquely named for islands around the United States. Aquidneck Island rests in Narragansett Bay in Rhode Island and is home to Naval Station Newport and several Coast Guard units as well. AQUIDNECK was commissioned in September 1986, so she's survived well beyond her expected service life and under our crew she continues to perform admirably. Before being shipped to the Middle East she was homeported in Atlantic Beach, NC. After 9/11, she was tasked with a new mission of homeland security and national defense, and in March 2003 at the request of the Navy, AQUIDNECK arrived here in Bahrain as part of the coalition force for the war in Iraq. Since then we've patrolled the entirety of the Arabian Gulf, and sometimes beyond it, to remain combat ready. Thank you for your consideration!

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IMPORTANT! DO NOT PRINT THIS PAGE!!!

Why? Because this list changes all the time due to unit movements, soldier transfers, or even soldier casualties.
It is also illegal. ALL content on this site is copyright Any Soldier Inc.
DO NOT send any letter or package to a soldier's address unless you check this web site the same day you mail your packages.
Please do not burden the soldiers or the APO/FPO by sending things when the soldiers are gone. If a soldier is not listed here anymore then that soldier's address is expired. Check here often!

Note that some of the units do not have ranks shown on their addresses.
This is done at the unit's request, but ALL of our contacts ARE Servicemembers.

Be sure to change the "ATTN" line to "ATTN: Any Female Soldier if your package is for a female!

DO NOT use this program if you expect or require a reply!
DO NOT expect, or require, a reply from a Soldier!
A supporter said it perfectly, "I mean, these guys and gals have other things on their minds, y’know? Like...oh, STAYING ALIVE?"


(NOTE *): Effective 1 May 2006 this web site added a major layer of security to our contacts' information. This change is necessary to protect our troops and ensure that Any Soldier will continue to operate.
The ONLY changes are that the addresses of our contacts are now hidden and the number of addresses you can get are limited. You may obtain addresses simply by clicking on the link provided and correctly filling out the form, the address will then be emailed to you immediately.

(NOTE **): The number shown is how many times a form was submitted requesting this address. This does NOT necessarily mean that this contact will be helped by that many folks. Rule of thumb is that anything 5 requests or less may in fact be no support at all. No way to tell exactly unless the contact lets you know in his/her update how much support they are getting.

(Note 1.): Note that postage to APO AE and FPO AE (E = Europe) is only to NY where the connection to the APO/FPO (APO = Army Post Office)(FPO = Fleet Post Office) is, or to San Francisco for APO AP and FPO AP (P = Pacific), so you don't pay postage all the way to Iraq/Afghanistan. You might consider picking contacts closer to your mailing area to help cut the cost of mailing. If you live on the East Coast, pick "AE", West Coast, pick "AP", Midwest, well...uh, Thank You for your Support! ;)

New with us (December 2005) you might notice "APO AA" and "FPO AA". This is for units in the Caribbean/South America. Normally. However, due to the nature of some units they may be in Iraq but have an address showing "FPO AA". Mail addresses to "AA" goes out of Miami, Florida.

(Note 2.): Why are military addresses weird? There isn't a street address or city. What gives? Correct, just about everything about the military is weird to civilians. Military units are very mobile, they move around a lot, often they even become part of another unit. The APO (Army Post Office) and FPO (Fleet Post Office) assign APO and FPO numbers as needed, they are NOT static. An APO/FPO number may be for a large unit, or a location. An APO/FPO number for Baghdad today may be for Frankfurt tomorrow.

(Note 3.): The "Expect to not mail past" date is only an approximate and is one of the least reliable things on this web site. It is because of this that you must check often before you send anything to this unit. There are a few reasons this date is not reliable, to include: it IS the Military, we ARE dealing with the APO/FPO/DPO. The only thing that does not change in the military is that things will change. PLEASE NOTE that a Contact is dropped off our active list 30 days PRIOR to their date leaving to help avoid mail bouncing.

(Note 4.): (Removed for OPSEC reasons)

(Note 5.): The lines, "Contact with approx number of Soldiers:" and "Approx how may Female Soldiers:" have NOTHING to do with unit strength. They are approximately how many other Troops the Contacts believe they can get packages to. This helps you understand that you should not send 100 packages to someone who only deals with 10 Troops.
Don't forget that if your package is for a female Soldier, be sure to change "ATTN: Any Soldier®" to "ATTN: Any Female Soldier".

( Note 6.): This is simply where the unit this contact is from. This is NOT a true picture of the folks in the unit as most all units are made up of folks from all over the United States.) A "Composite Unit" is one made up of other units and is usually temporary for a particular mission.

( Note 7.): Updated APO/FPO/DPO mailing restrictions> courtesy of Oconus.com (gone now) (Note: About Restriction "U2": "U2 - Limited to First Class Letters", Box "R" is for retired personnel that live overseas and are still authorized an APO/FPO box. Their address will be something like Box 3345R. Doubt you will see anything like that in Afghanistan or Iraq or ...)(Please Note: Sometime in August 2013, Oconus.com changed the code on their page and our form doesn't work with them anymore, so a link to their page is the best we can do, sorry.)


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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that all product photographs, descriptions and specifications on this website are accurate. However, inadvertent errors may occur, and changes in design or materials, due to our continual effort to improve products, may result in some change in specifications before subsequent publications are issued.
Any Soldier® reserves the right to modify or change specifications without notice.